Why “After You” is basically “Me Before You” and why that’s a good thing.

Hello, fellow booklovers or just random visitors! It’s time to look into Jojo Moyes new book “After You” (The sequel to “Me Before You”). Ready?

Summary

Lou is depressed, but surely, she can’t admit that. She’s actually not depressed in the normal sense of the word, but she’s actually right there, where she started in the first book. She works at a place she doesn’t like, she lives in a flat, which she doesn’t love and she is lonelier than ever. The tide turns when she is falling of her … terrace? Yes, our sweet Lou was yelling angry at the dead man she loved after having a few drinks – and being distracted by a voice, while your balancing on the edge of the roof  isn’t the best way to deal with your anger. Because when you fall down and crash into your neighbours expensive antique, everyone thinks you wanted to kill yourself. Duh.
It’s alright, she survives. Her bones get broken a little and everyone thinks she had suicidal reasons, to “fall” off a rooftop.
Well, she get’s back to live with her parents and her awfully annoying sister to recover. Moving back into her flat something really, really … shocking happens. (If you don’t want to now, skip the rest of the summary). Will’s daughter is standing in her doorframe and this girl is a total mess.
Basically, Lou has to juggle a really, really messed up teenager with a stupid mother and some really BIG character flaws, with a shitty job, with the feeling of having disappointed Will’s last wishes, a support group and this really cute medic, who saved her life. Want to know more? Read the book.

For a more “professional” summary, click here.

Opinion

I was crying, I was laughing and I was (most of the time) really frustrated. I know, as someone who has no idea what to actually DO with the opportunities offered, how hard it is to choose a path. BUT DAMN – Lou is totally losing it, in every way possible. She is working in a terrible bar with a embarrassing and even more terrible outfit – and she doesn’t really care. But Lou is good. She’s one of those people who put the happiness of others (for example Will’s daughter Lily) before her own needs and that’s rare.

To skip the part where I totally go nuts with this girl is a favour (I was never this difficult as a teenager but my mum wasn’t even near that horrible person Lily calls “Mother”).
The writing and story are as good or as bad as the first book (Which worked perfectly fine for me). You dive back into the world and yes, you’re terribly sad that Will (that ass) is gone and Lou is left on her own.
I recommend this book to all of the readers and fans from “Me Before You” because it’s as heart wrenching and real as the first book. I hope you enjoyed this rambling and have great day.

xx

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A fresh start to a fresh series? “The Hidden Princess”, a YA-book with more maturity than I’ve expected

Hello there! I’m back again with some books I’ve read recently and it’s up to you to decide which one is fitted best for you! The next post will be online next week 🙂

For the YA-Lovers, I’ve discovered “The Hidden Princess”. The story of the oldest princess Amelie with a special ability which she considers more curse than blessing. She can lure men into doing nearly everything she asks them to, but her control is limited. To secure everyone safety (even her own) she was not exactly locked away but kind of  … locked away (she lives with nuns). The King (her step-father with not so nice intensions towards her) sends her off on missions. Serving her country is literally all she can think about (and the problem that she has nearly no freedom at all). The kingdom borders with Draeden, the kingdom where magic (like hers) is forbidden – oh, I should probably mention that all the five kingdoms in this world forbade their citizens to cross borders (total isolation rocks…).
Well, she meets the Prince of Draeden (handsome and smart), gets captured by him (unfortunate circumstances) and then the “struggling with myself” and “Damn, I want to be finally free” starts (The good part!). But the story doesn’t evolve as happy and glittery and girlish as you might think. If you’re interested in a more eloquent Summary, you can read it on Goodreads.

Opinion
Okay, there were some cheesy moments (but please, who thought there wouldn’t be some?) and yes, the Prince and the Princess fall in love (who would’ve guessed that?), but I really, really liked the story and the way they got to know each other. Who can say, they fell in love with a woman during capturing her? Yeah, right, there is something called the Stockholm-Syndrom but’s a whole different story.
The style of writing is one of the main points I enjoyed this story so much. After a few pages you are so taken in by the events, the story and the characters, you can barely put the book away (once you’ve started).
Amelie (the Princess) is also a very intense character. She has dedicated her life to serving her country (more or less voluntarily) and is convinced she can’t trust anyone (leave alone a handsome prince). Fortunately, the characters in this book are older than 16 (I’m very bad with my memory but if I recall correctly she is about 19-21?) and so the way of treating problems is more mature (thank goodness!).
All in all I would give it four stars out of five. Its a really good read and I am anticipating the sequel, but it’s not compareable to “The Name of the Wind” (which is really hard to top.

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Title: The Hidden Princess
Author: Cara Coe
Pages: 228
Released: June 2nd 2015
Rating: 4/5 ★ – very enjoyable!

Waiting on Wednesday? -Released (old) WoW-Picks

Check out the books (old WoW’s of mine) which are now available!

Firewalker (Worldwalker #2) by Josephine Angelini. Since September 1st 2015 available. It’s the sequel to Trial by Fire. I have to catch up quickly – did you already read it?
Just a quick Summary to refresh your memory:

“You think I’m a monster, but my choices, as ruthless as they seem, are justified.”

Lily is back in her own universe, and she’s ready to start a new life with Rowan by her side. True, she almost died in the Pyre that fueled their escape from New Salem, and must hide her magic for the safety of everyone she cares about, but compared to fighting the Woven, the monstrous creatures inhabiting the alternate Salem, life is looking pretty good.

Unfortunately, Lillian, ruthless ruler of the 13 Cities, is not willing to let Lily go that easily. If she can’t persuade Lily to return to her world, she will force her to come back by doing away with the ones she loves.”

Darken the Stars (Kricket #3) by Amy A. Bartol. The sequel wasn’t as good as the first book. “Darken the Stars” is the final book (I believe) and I’m eager to finish the series. Can anybody recommend reading the final book?
What are we dealing with? 

“Kyon Ensin finally has what he’s always wanted: possession of Kricket Hollowell, the priestess who foresees the future. Together, their combined power will be unrivaled. Kricket, however, doesn’t crave the crown of Ethar—she has an unbreakable desire to live life on her own terms, a life that she desperately wants to share with her love, Trey Allairis.

As conspiracies rage in the war for Ethar, Kricket’s so-called allies want to use her as a spy. Even those held closest cannot be trusted—including Astrid, her sister, and Giffen, a member of a mysterious order with a hidden agenda. But Kricket’s resolve will not allow her to be used as anyone’s pawn, even as the Brotherhood sharpens its plans to cut out her heart.

As the destiny prophesied by her mother approaches, Kricket will backtrack through her fiery future to reshape it. For she knows one thing above all else: the only person she can truly count on is herself.”

AND for all the Percy-Jackson-Lovers out there (me included) – “The Sword of Summer” by Rick Riordan was released yesterday (Excitement!!). Was anyone quick enough to read through the night
and can tell me how great it actually is? (I expect nothing less than GREAT.)

“Magnus Chase has always been a troubled kid. Since his mother’s mysterious death, he’s lived alone on the streets of Boston, surviving by his wits, keeping one step ahead of the police and the truant officers.
One day, he’s tracked down by a man he’s never met—a man his mother claimed was dangerous. The man tells him an impossible secret: Magnus is the son of a Norse god.
The Viking myths are true. The gods of Asgard are preparing for war. Trolls, giants and worse monsters are stirring for doomsday. To prevent Ragnarok, Magnus must search the Nine Worlds for a weapon that has been lost for thousands of years.
When an attack by fire giants forces him to choose between his own safety and the lives of hundreds of innocents, Magnus makes a fatal decision.
Sometimes, the only way to start a new life is to die . .”

… and my personal favourite, which I’m going to buy as quick as possible – “A Thousand Nights” by E. K. Johnston. I’m really excited for this 1001 Nights – Retelling. Are you?
Summary:

“Lo-Melkhiin killed three hundred girls before he came to her village, looking for a wife. When she sees the dust cloud on the horizon, she knows he has arrived. She knows he will want the loveliest girl: her sister. She vows she will not let her be next.

And so she is taken in her sister’s place, and she believes death will soon follow. Lo-Melkhiin’s court is a dangerous palace filled with pretty things: intricate statues with wretched eyes, exquisite threads to weave the most beautiful garments. She sees everything as if for the last time.But the first sun rises and sets, and she is not dead. Night after night, Lo-Melkhiin comes to her and listens to the stories she tells, and day after day she is awoken by the sunrise. Exploring the palace, she begins to unlock years of fear that have tormented and silenced a kingdom. Lo-Melkhiin was not always a cruel ruler. Something went wrong.

Far away, in their village, her sister is mourning. Through her pain, she calls upon the desert winds, conjuring a subtle unseen magic, and something besides death stirs the air.

Back at the palace, the words she speaks to Lo-Melkhiin every night are given a strange life of their own. Little things, at first: a dress from home, a vision of her sister. With each tale she spins, her power grows. Soon she dreams of bigger, more terrible magic: power enough to save a king, if she can put an end to the rule of a monster.”

That’s it for today. The last few days have been terrible because I was really sick. It is getting better but I hope you forgive me, that I don’t have a WoW-Pick for you this week. But please – Let me know what you selected!

Have a great day! Tüdeldü!

xx

Should I continue reading Catch 22? – Catch 22: Aufgeben oder Weitermachen?

There hasn’t been a book in a long time which needed this amount of concentration. Catch-22 is a classic and while relaxing in the garden, a friend put this book into my hands and told me to read it. Has anyone out there read Catch 22 – because it’s so exhausting. The style of writing isn’t really my cup of tea, but the characters are pretty interesting (crazy and strange). After 50 pages, I gave up. I was on vacation and didn’t want to upset my brain with “high” literature while doing basically … nothing (yes, I know, I’m a very lazy person and I should use my free time in a more … efficient way). Now, somebody mentioned to me that there is a secret in Catch-22 (which isn’t really a “secret”) – and I read the wikipedia article (shame on me!). Now, I’m eager to read the book because I know what it’s all about. But can I get through that awfully exhausting style of writing? Is it worth it?  What would you suggest?

Catch-22

Joseph Heller

453 Pages

“His problem is Colonel Cathcart, who keeps raising the number of missions the men must fly to complete their service. Yet if Yossarian makes any attempts to excuse himself from the perilous missions that he’s committed to flying, he’s trapped by the Great Loyalty Oath Crusade, the bureaucratic rule from which the book takes its title: a man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but if he makes the necessary formal request to be relieved of such missions, the very act of making the request proves that he’s sane and therefore ineligible to be relieved.”

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Selten habe ich so ein anstrengend Buch gelesen wie Catch-22. Was heißt schon gelesen? Nach rund 50 Seiten wurde mir der Schreibstil für den Urlaub zu anstrengend. So viel Verrücktheit in einem Buch, dann auch nur scheinbar “verrückte” Personen … es ist sehr reizvoll, das gebe ich zu, aber ich hatte nun einmal nicht den Nerv. Als aber jemand das “Geheimnis” bei Catch-22 erwähnte, das eigentlich keins ist (uh lá lá), konnte ich nicht widerstehen den Wikipedia-Artikel zu lesen (ja, Schande über mich). Die Frage bleibt – lohnt es sich, sich durch die anstrengende Sprache durchzuquälen? Hat da jemand Erfahrungen gemacht?

Catch 22

Joseph Heller

592 Seiten

“Catch 22, also Falle 22 oder Trick 22- das ist die ebenso irrsinnige wie ausweglose Dienstanweisung für das amerikanische Bombengeschwader, der zufolge Bomberpilot Yossarian nur dann von weiteren Einsätzen verschont bleibt, wenn er als verrückt anerkannt wird. Verrückt aber kann niemand sein, der sich weigern will, immer weitere großenteils sinnlose Einsätze zu fliegen. Also muß Yossarian ebenso wie seine Kameraden weiterfliegen, obwohl er sich die größte Mühe gibt, als verrückt zu erscheinen. Durch scheinbar absurdes Verhalten der militärischen Maschinerie ihre eigene Absurdität zu demonstrieren. Aber die Kriegsmaschinerie, gespeist aus persönlichem Ehrgeiz, Dummheit, Brutalität und Duckmäuserei, erkennt ihren eigenen Irrsinn nicht in dem Spiegel, den Yossarian – im Grunde der einzig Normale unter lauter Verrückten – vorhält.”